Use my resignation letter example to resign from your job easily. There’s also a resignation email message example if you’re remote, work from home (WFH), or just want to resign via email.

Whether you’re resigning from a great job for an even greater opportunity or you’re quitting a career that sucks, leaving your position using a professional resignation letter can keep the door open for future jobs.

Your future employer and colleagues may come from your past, so always leave your current position with style and grace.

resignation letter

Image: Resignation Letter or Resignation Email

People change jobs, companies fold, freelance gigs pop up, and entrepreneurs build new and fresh organizations, so stay on good terms with people (even if you don’t like them) so future opportunities are possible.

Besides, with social media sites like LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook it’s far too easy for a slighted employer or colleague to amplify your negative parting words. So don’t let a bad post become the sign post for your career.

Resignation Letter Example (three sentences)

[Your Name]
[Address/Email Address]

[Today’s Date]

[Manager Name and Title]
Cc: [HR Contact Name]
[Employer Company Name]
[Address]

Dear Mr./Ms.Lastname,

Please accept this letter as my formal notice of resignation from [Employer Company Name] as a [Your Position]. My last day of employment will be [Last Date].

Thank you for all the opportunities this company has provided me.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]

No swearing and no “I told you so’s” either. Three sentences. Done. Done. And more done. All the done and none of the drama.

Resignation Letter Example (download)

Prefer a downloadable resignation letter example document so Human Resources can print and rubber stamp it in triplicate? I’ve got you covered. The rubber stamp in triplicate is up to your old boss. Smile.

Resignation Letter Example

Download: Resignation Example Download

What to Include in a Resignation Letter

This letter of resignation example is short and sweet at only three sentences, and that’s how you win the resignation game. Here’s why in three easy steps, plus a bonus:

  • 1. Say you’re leaving. Be brief. Your resignation letter is neither a confessional nor an explanation, so don’t feel you need to voice parting words. And don’t go into details! To get the job done, just say, “Please accept this letter as my formal notice of resignation from [Employer Company Name] as a [Your Position].” One sentence and done.
  • 2. Give Notice. You may want to get outta there fast, but it’s better to give the required or standard duration which is often two weeks notice. A little notice can help maintain a good relationship with your former employer. Just be clear of your ending date, for example: “My last day of employment will be [Last Date].”
  • 3. Express gratitude. Kill them with kindness by giving thanks, even if you don’t truly mean it. And if you do mean it, more power to ya! For example: “Thank you for all the opportunities this company has provided me.”
  • 4. Need a transition? Bonus sentence: If your job requires a transition, go ahead and add: “Let me know if there is anything I can do to make this transition easier. You can contact me at YourName@email.com or [phone number].” Leaving an invitation to be of assistance during or after a transition is nice, but not always necessary. This fourth sentence is up to you.

Resignation Email Message Example and Writing Tips

Pandemic-era and WFH situations make it possible these days to just quit it by hitting send. If you’re into signing off via email, here’s your resignation email message example. Copy, paste, and proofread your way into a new career. Easy.

Resignation Email Message Example

Email Subject Line: [Your Name] Resignation

Dear Mr./Ms. Lastname,

Please accept this letter as my formal notice of resignation from [Employer Company Name] as a [Your Position]. My last day will be [Date].

Thank you for all the opportunities this company has provided me.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]

I’m a fan of keeping email resignations short and sweet because it’s too easy to forward messages into an eternity or into a career oblivion. Keep your email drama-free — the less you say, the less likely ANYTHING will come back to haunt you. Kudos for not getting haunted by a bad email resignation.

Here are 6 writing tips for resigning via email:

  • 1. Write a clear subject line. It may feel cold and terse, but a clear and concise resignation email subject line removes all doubt and is unlikely to get missed or buried in a stack of unread messages. Hit them with the news at the outside.
  • 2. Say you’re resigning. Be concise. Your resignation email message is neither a confessional nor an explanation — you don’t need to go into details and always keep it drama-free.
  • 3. Give Notice. Giving the required notice (often two weeks notice) can help maintain a good relationship with your former employer. No one wants to be stuck with a pile of work, so specify a specific date.
  • 4. Express gratitude. Be kind and grateful, even if you don’t mean it. This is hard for many, but worth it. Promise.
  • 5. Offer a transition period? If your job requires a transition, go ahead and add: “Let me know if there is anything I can do to make this transition easier. You can contact me at Your Name@email.com or [phone number].” Personally, unless you have a job in a specialized sector, feel free to skip this step. You’re not getting paid to hold the next employee’s hand after your leave.
  • 6. Proofread the email. Signing off with a spelling or some other mistake can be embarrassing, so be sure to edit your resignation email message before hitting send! Keep your tone even and neutral.

To recap: Your resignation email message should be drama-free (don’t go into details), use a clear email subject line, state your last day of work, give two weeks notice, and optionally offer a transition contact (your cell or personal email).

Love love love,
Kerry